Carabinieri train African police forces on human rights and the protection of cultural goods

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ROME, OCTOBER 30 – The training course for the National Police Forces of Uganda and Ruanda, offered by the Carabinieri in Rome, came today to a conclusion. The program, financed by the General Director for Globalization and Global Issues of MAECI, is part of a broader training program held by the Carabinieri for police forces across Africa (Uganda, Rwanda, African Union, Camerun, Kenya, Senegal, Zimbabwe) with which cooperation has been consolidated.

The training session that has just concluded lasted two weeks and saw the involvement of ten agents from Uganda and ten from Rwanda on the theme of “Respecting human rights in Police operations.” A simulation of a public order service was furthermore carried out, representing the practical synthesis of the activities conducted. The participating agents had already attended, throughout May and June in their respective countries of origin, courses on ‘Respecting human rights’, ‘Replacement techniques’, ‘Anti-terrorism’, ‘Road traffic control’ and ‘Rangers’.

 

Giuseppe Palma, Commander of the 8th Regiment of Lazio, delivered the attendance certificates.

Over the past days, the course on the ‘Protection of Cultural Properties: Legislation and Investigative Techniques’ -run by the Carabinieri in favor of African ministerial officials and police- also came to an end. The 18 participants coming from Botswana, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Nigeria, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Togo were presented the protection model established and applied the past 50 years by the Carabinieri TPC Command established in 1969. This model is largely used, both in Italy and abroad, to contrast the continued threats to cultural heritage.

In particular, the course focused on the International Conventions regarding the protection of cultural heritage (AJA 1954, UNESCO 1970 e UNIDROIT 1995);  preventive actions to be carried out at archeological sites; access to the illicitly stolen cultural heritage Data Bank; anticrime security controls in favor of sites such as museums, galleries and libraries with the aim of preventing theft and damage; the implementation of custom control and the importance of categorization for the traceability of cultural goods. Furthermore, during training periods, some of the most complex investigative activities concluded with success in the last years by the military of the TPC Command were presented. (SB@OnuItalia)