Women, Peace and Security: Italy co-sponsors new resolution and reaffirms its support

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NEW YORK, OCTOBER 30 – “As we approach the 20th anniversary of Resolution 1325, we must redouble our efforts to fully implement the Women, Peace and Security Agenda, in order to fill the remaining important gaps”, the Italian Permanent Representative at the United Nations, Mariangela Zappia, said during the annual Security Council debate on Women, Peace and Security, at the end of which a resolution co-sponsored by Italy was unanimously adopted.

“Italy is devoting increasing resources to the implementation of the WPS Agenda”, said Zappia: “We are implementing our Third National Action Plan, which was elaborated with the active engagement of civil society organizations, academia, NGOs, private sectors, and trade unions, and received public funding by the Italian Parliament. The Plan envisages a monitoring and evaluation mechanism, and periodic reports on the state of its implementation. A similar approach is inspiring the drafting of our Fourth National Action Plan”.

Zappia reminded the Council the initiative, launched in October 2017, of the Mediterranean Women Mediators Network. “We are very proud of the results it has achieved so far: new members joined; the first two local antennas – in Cyprus and Turkey – were established; training, capacity building and networking opportunities were provided… The next step is the organization in Rome of two events. On December 3 and 4, in collaboration with UN Women, we are hosting, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, an international seminar on ‘Strengthening Women’s Participation in Peace Processes’. “The next day, in the framework of the MED Dialogues, Italy will organize the Third edition of the Women Forum”, said the Italian Ambassador.

Reinforcing the role of women in peacekeeping is just as important. Italy is working to increase the number of women and to better integrate a gender perspective in the blue helmets’ training and education. Zappia also underlined how the protection and promotion of women rights and the fight against all forms of gender violence and discrimination are a priority for Italy’s international action and its cooperation for development.

For the first time in the history of the UN, not all countries expected to speak (approximately 40) were able to make an intervention. Among the austerity measures adopted by the Secretariat to deal with the budget crisis provoked by the total or partial insolvency of many member states, a limit was established on the length of the meetings. The United States recently issued a payment, allowing the United Nations to pay the staff in November. Uncertainty still remains for the following month. (SB@OnuItalia)